The coronavirus pandemic has changed a lot of things. One thing that’s still the same? Falling is NOT a normal part of aging. There are steps you can take to reduce your risk. Answer 12 questions to learn more.

Check Your Risk for Falling

Question 1 of 12


Why it matters

People who have fallen once are likely to fall again.  

Question 2 of 12


Why it matters

People who have been advised to use a cane or walker may already be more likely to fall.

Question 3 of 12


Why it matters

Unsteadiness or needing support while walking are signs of poor balance.

Question 4 of 12


Why it matters

This is also a sign of poor balance.

Question 5 of 12


Why it matters

People who are worried about falling are more likely to fall.

Question 6 of 12


Why it matters

This is a sign of weak leg muscles, a major reason for falling.

Question 7 of 12


Why it matters

This is also a sign of weak leg muscles.

Question 8 of 12


Why it matters

Rushing to the bathroom, especially at night, increases your chance of falling. 

Question 9 of 12


Why it matters

Numbness in your feet can cause stumbles and lead to falls.

Question 10 of 12


Why it matters

Side effects from medicines can sometimes increase your chance of falling.

Question 11 of 12


Why it matters

These medicines can sometimes increase your chance of falling.

Question 12 of 12


Why it matters

Symptoms of depression, such as not feeling well or feeling slowed down, are linked to falls.


If you scored 4 points or more, you may be at risk for falling.

Find out how to reduce your risk by reading our Tips for Older Adults & Caregivers.

Enter your email below to get a copy of your Falls Free CheckUp Report that you can share and discuss with your doctor and family.


This checklist was developed by the Greater Los Angeles VA Geriatric Research Education Clinical Center and affiliates and is a validated fall risk self-assessment tool (Rubenstein et al. J Safety Res; 2011: 42(6)493-499).
This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.