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Inogen Portable Oxygen Concentrator Review 2022

Aug 15, 2022

By Chrissy Holm
Medically Reviewed by Jenny Sanford, AGNP
Fact Checked

Affiliate Disclosure
This content and its featured products and services were independently reviewed by a third-party, credentialed Reviews Team. If you make a purchase using the links included, our partners may earn a commission. NCOA, however, does not receive a commission for purchases.

Key Takeaways

  • Inogen’s portable oxygen concentrators range from $2,651–$3,586, depending on the battery and warranty you select.
  • These portable oxygen concentrators are all intermittent flow, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approved, and have a range of flow settings (which determine how much oxygen they dispense).
  • The company offers a 30-day risk-free trial, a 3-year standard warranty, and an option for an upgrade to an unlimited warranty.

If you’ve been diagnosed with a respiratory disease that requires supplemental oxygen, you’re not alone. Chronic respiratory diseases are one of the leading causes of illness in the world, according to the World Health Organization.1

In the past, common chronic conditions like COPD or emphysema would have meant spending the remainder of your life at home with an oxygen machine to help you breathe. Portable oxygen concentrators (POCs), like Inogen One machines, have changed that, making it possible to travel farther from home and maintain an independent, active life.

Inogen offers three travel-friendly, FAA-approved portable oxygen concentrator models, which means that each model is approved for use on airplanes by the FAA. Keep reading for our Inogen portable oxygen concentrator review and to discover the pros, cons, and costs of each model so you can determine the best portable oxygen concentrator for you.

Why you can trust our expert review

Our Reviews Team recommends products and services we believe provide value in the lives of our readers. We’ve spent more than 1,000 hours carrying out in-depth research on portable oxygen concentrators to give you the most accurate review. To make our selections, we:

  • Engaged in independent research
  • Mystery shopped four brands and five models of portable oxygen concentrators
  • Reviewed academic research into the efficacy of portable oxygen concentrators
  • Read verified customer reviews from trusted third parties such as the Better Business Bureau (BBB) and Trustpilot

Our Reviews Team consulted with three geriatric care experts to learn more about POCs and how they can enhance users’ quality of life. We determined the following factors to be important for our readers when shopping for a portable oxygen concentrator. 

  • Cost
  • Ease of use
  • Oxygen delivery method
  • Number of settings
  • Weight
  • Battery life
  • Time to recharge battery
  • Warranty

We had all of our selections medically reviewed by an expert in the field to ensure that each brand and model is appropriate for our readers’ needs.

Why Inogen is one of our Reviews Team’s top picks

Our Reviews Team chose to review Inogen because it offers one of the smallest portable oxygen concentrators on the market—the Inogen One G4—and because all of its models are FAA-approved. 

When researching Inogen, our Reviews Team also liked that Inogen has two warranty options, a robust frequently asked questions section on its website, and a convenient purchasing option. A notable drawback is that the company only offers intermittent flow options, also known as pulse flow, which may not work for those who need a continuous flow portable oxygen concentrator.

We’ll cover some pros and cons of the Inogen One models, how to purchase these portable oxygen concentrators, and how the company compares to other brands.

Pros and cons of Inogen

Pros 30-day risk-free trial on all machines Two warranty options: standard 3-year or upgrade to unlimited All portable oxygen concentrators are FAA-approved Good flow range settings for the G3 and G5 models
Cons Only offers intermittent flow Machines aren’t water-resistant G3 machine doesn’t have Bluetooth capabilities

Table 1 Comparisons of Inogen portable oxygen concentrators, as of June 2022

Inogen model

G3

G4

G5

Cost

Only available through Medicare and insurance; cost depends on coverage

$2,651–$3,344, depending on the battery and warranty selected

$2,882–$3,586, depending on the battery and warranty selected

Battery life

Single battery:
4.7 hours (setting 1)
4 hours (setting 2)

 

Double battery:
Up to 10 hours
on setting 1

Single battery:
2.7 hours (setting 1)
2.25 hours (setting 2)

 

Double battery:
Up to 5 hours
on setting 1

Single battery:
6.5 hours (setting 1)
4.5 hours (setting 2)

 

Double battery:
Up to 13 hours
on setting 1

Type of flow

Intermittent flow

Intermittent flow

Intermittent flow

Flow settings

1–5 settings

1–3 settings

1–6 settings

Max oxygen output by liters per minute (L/min)

1.05 L/min

0.63 L/min

1.26 L/min

Noise level in decibels (dB)

39 dB

40 dB (setting 2)

38 dB (setting 2)

FAA-approved

Yes

Yes

Yes

Bluetooth capabilities

No

Yes

Yes

Water-resistant

No

No

No

Warranty or protection plan

3-year standard, optional upgrade to a lifetime warranty

3-year standard, optional upgrade to a lifetime warranty

3-year standard, optional upgrade to a lifetime warranty

Free trial

Yes,
30-day risk-free

Yes,
30-day risk-free

Yes,
30-day risk-free

Inogen portable oxygen concentrator reviews

Inogen One G3

Inogen One G3 review

  • Cost: Only available through Medicare and insurance; cost depends on coverage
  • Weight: 
    • 4.9 pounds with single battery
    • 5.7 pounds with double battery
  • Dimensions: 
    • 8.75 inches long x 3 inches wide x 8.25 inches high with single battery
    • 8.78″ L x 3″ W x 9.29″ H with double battery
  • Battery life: 
    • 4 hours, 40 minutes on setting 1; 4 hours on setting 2 with single battery
    • Up to 10 hours on setting 1 with double battery
  • Battery charging time: 3 hours for single battery
  • Delivery/flow type: Intermittent flow
  • Range of flow settings: 1–5
  • Noise level: 39 decibels (dB)

The Inogen One G3 is a portable oxygen concentrator with intermittent flow. The G3 is only available as a rental through Medicare or other insurance, unlike the G4 and G5 machines, which can be purchased online with a prescription. That makes the G3 best for those experiencing a temporary condition that requires oxygen therapy. 

Of all the models in this review, the G3 is the heaviest at 4.9 pounds with a single battery, and 5.7 pounds with a double battery. But it also has more flow settings (1–5) than the lightest model on this list (1–3 for the Inogen One G4). Flow settings dictate how much oxygen the machine delivers with each breath you take—the higher the number, the more oxygen it delivers. You may need more or fewer settings depending on your condition.  

The G3’s noise level goes to 39 decibels, approximately the soft hum of a refrigerator according to 3M.2 All Inogen POCs have a similar noise level—the G4 is 40 decibels, and the G5 is 38.

The G3 battery lasts 4.5 hours on setting 1, takes three hours to recharge fully, and is expected to last for 500 total charges. This is slightly lower than the Inogen model with the longest battery life on this list, the Inogen One G5 (which has a maximum battery life of 6.5 hours).

The G3 comes with AC/DC power, which allows the user to charge the machine’s batteries while continuing to use it, whether at home, in the car, or in an airplane. For example, if you need to charge your concentrator while traveling by plane, you can connect to a DC power port on the plane while still using the machine. Most planes have power ports close to each seat. Inogen also offers an external battery charger accessory for this model, which is useful in the event of power outages or extended time outdoors.

Breath detection alert mode

All Inogen portable oxygen concentrators have a breath detection alert mode, which, when enabled, emits an audible and visual alert when breath hasn’t been detected for 60 seconds. If the machine doesn’t detect a breath, it’s usually due to placement of the nasal cannula (the tube that delivers the oxygen to your nose) or a connectivity issue. When the machine doesn’t detect a breath for longer than 60 seconds, it switches to auto pulse mode, releasing bursts of oxygen until it detects a breath again. This feature can help reassure you that the device will continue to provide oxygen until a caregiver can assist.

Drawbacks

The Inogen G3 is not water-resistant, so our Reviews Team recommends not exposing it to water, damp environments, or rain, which could lead to electrical shock or damage to the machine.

We also don’t recommend leaving your concentrator in environments that can reach high temperatures, such as an unoccupied car or close to a heat source, since heat can damage the machine and cost you money to repair or replace it. 

Another potential drawback is that the G3 doesn’t have Bluetooth capabilities (Bluetooth technology lets you connect wirelessly with other smart devices such as your smartphone) and doesn’t connect to the Inogen Connect App like the G4 and G5 machines. The app allows you to check your battery life, monitor your oxygen use, and more.

Accessories

The Inogen One G3 comes with the following supplies:

  • Portable oxygen concentrator unit
  • Wall (AC) charger/power cord
  • Car (DC) charger/power cord
  • One rechargeable battery
  • Custom carrying bag
  • User manual

Inogen offers additional accessories for purchase with the G3, such as a custom G3 backpack, carrying bag, and cart, so you can protect your oxygen concentrator and customize the style, ease of carrying, and transportation options. 

The G3 could be a good option for those wanting a POC with a longer battery life and who only need the machine temporarily. If you want to buy a machine with more advanced features, like Bluetooth and app connectivity, another Inogen portable oxygen concentrator might be best for you.

Inogen One G4

Inogen One G4 review

  • Cost: $2,651–$3,344, depending on the battery and warranty selected
  • Weight: 
    • 2.8 pounds with single battery
    • 3.3 pounds with double battery
  • Dimensions: 
    • 5.91 inches long x 2.68 inches wide x 7.2 inches high with single battery 
    • 5.91″ L x 2.68″ W x 7.79″ H with double battery
  • Battery life: 
    • 2 hours, 40 minutes on setting 1; 2 hours, 25 minutes on setting 2 with single battery
    • Up to 5 hours on setting 1 with double battery
  • Battery charging time: 3 hours, 25 minutes for single battery
  • Delivery/flow type: Intermittent flow
  • Range of flow settings: 1–3
  • Noise level: 40 dB

The Inogen One G4, a portable intermittent flow oxygen concentrator, is lighter than the G3, making it the lightest model on this list. If weight and ease of portability are your most important considerations, the G4 may be a good fit.

It’s also the cheapest option for an Inogen portable oxygen concentrator that has Bluetooth capabilities. The other model on this list that has Bluetooth capabilities, the G5, costs about $200 more on average. 

The noise level for the G4 is 40 dB, one decibel higher than the G3. That does make it the loudest model on this list, but one decibel higher doesn’t make much of a difference. Similar to the G3, you can charge the G4 on AC power inside the home or by using DC power in a car or airplane. Inogen also offers an optional external charger for when you’re away from home.

Drawbacks

The G4 offers the lowest battery life on this list, providing less than 3 hours of power on setting 1, compared to more than 4 hours with the G3. It also takes 25 minutes longer to fully charge the G4 compared to the G3, which can be a drawback for those with active lifestyles. 

In addition, the G4 has fewer oxygen flow settings (1–3) compared to the G3’s 1–5 flow settings. Fewer settings may mean less variability between adjustments.

The G4 isn’t water-resistant, but Inogen has stated that the concentrator was tested to withstand rain for short periods, such as while transferring it from a car to a home. Adding a carrying bag will provide another layer of protection for your portable oxygen concentrator. 

Inogen also recommends that you avoid running your G4 in temperatures lower than 41˚F or higher than 95˚F for an extended time, since extreme temperatures can shorten your battery life.

Inogen connect app

The G4 does have Bluetooth capabilities, allowing you to use your smartphone or tablet to connect to your concentrator through the Inogen Connect App, which you can download from the App Store and Google Play

The app allows you to view information such as the concentrator’s filter life, nasal cannula life, battery cycles, and battery status. It also alerts you to software updates for your concentrator. This helps keep the machine working properly.

Filter life shows the number of days since the filters were last cleaned, making it easier to remember to schedule the recommended weekly cleaning. Cannula life shows the number of days since the cannula was last changed, which should be replaced based on your physician’s instructions. Finally, the battery cycle shows the number of times you have fully charged the battery. The G4’s battery lasts for 500 total charges. 

Accessories

The Inogen One G4 comes with the following supplies:

  • Portable oxygen concentrator unit
  • Wall (AC) charger/power cord
  • Car (DC) charger/power cord
  • One rechargeable battery
  • Custom carrying bag
  • Carry strap
  • User manual

Inogen offers additional accessories for purchase with the G4, such as a custom G4 backpack, carrying bag, and hip bag.

The G4 could be a good option for those searching for a lighter machine with an app connection that they can purchase rather than rent. If you are looking for longer battery life, lower noise level, and more flow settings, the G5 might be a better choice.

Inogen One G5

Inogen One G5 review

  • Cost: $2,882–$3,586, depending on the battery and warranty selected
  • Weight: 
    • 4.7 pounds with single battery
    • 5.7 pounds with double battery
  • Dimensions: 
    • 7.19 inches long x 3.26 inches wide x 8.15 inches high with single battery
    • 7.19″ L x 3.26″ W x 9.03″ H with double battery 
  • Battery life: 
    • 6.5 hours on setting 1; 4.5 hours on setting 2 with single battery
    • Up to 13 hours on setting 1 with double battery
  • Battery charging time: 4 hours for single battery
  • Delivery/flow type: Intermittent flow
  • Range of flow settings: 1–6
  • Noise level: 38 dB

The Inogen One G5 is an intermittent flow portable oxygen concentrator with a range of 1–6 flow settings, the highest variety of settings for the three Inogen One machines. This machine is also the quietest oxygen machine from Inogen, with a noise level of 38 dB. The G5’s size is in the middle of the other models—bigger than the G4 and smaller than the G3. 

The G5 has the longest battery life of the three models, reaching 6.5 hours on setting 1 with one battery, and up to 13 hours with the optional double battery. This option is great if you’re looking for long battery life. While the battery lasts longer, it does take an hour longer to fully charge than the G3’s battery, clocking in at 4 hours charging time.

Like the G4, the G5 has Bluetooth capabilities, allowing you to use your smartphone or tablet to connect to the Inogen Connect app to check the status of your filter, cannula, and battery life, and to access the user manual, FAQs, and troubleshooting tips. Having these resources available through your smartphone or tablet is convenient and can make the process of getting to know your portable oxygen concentrator easier, saving time and energy and helping you to schedule recommended filter and cannula cleanings. 

Drawbacks

The G5 has a lot going for it—it has the longest battery life, the most flow settings, and the lowest noise level of any model on this list. But it is the most expensive at about $200 more on average than the G4. 

It’s also almost the heaviest model on this list—the G3 is only about 0.2 pounds heavier. 

But higher cost and weight are the only notable drawbacks of the G5 compared to the G4 or G3. It outperforms the G4 and G3 in every other criteria that our Reviews Team used to evaluate these models. 

Accessories

The Inogen One G5 comes with the following supplies:

  • Portable oxygen concentrator unit
  • Wall (AC) charger/power cord
  • Car (DC) charger/power cord
  • One rechargeable battery
  • Custom carrying bag
  • User manual

You can purchase additional accessories for your G5, such as a custom G5 backpack, carry bag, and cart to help transport your portable oxygen concentrator. 

The G5 model may be a good fit for those who want a longer battery life, a quieter machine, and Bluetooth technology. If you want a lighter portable oxygen concentrator, you might prefer the G4 model.

Inogen history

Inogen was founded in 2001 by University of California, Santa Barbara, graduates Alison Bauerlein, Brenton Taylor, and Byron Myers after their idea for a portable oxygen concentrator won the 2001 UCSB New Venture Competition

Inspired by Bauerlein’s grandmother, Mae, who complained to her granddaughter about the inconveniences and limitations of using a heavy oxygen tank, the group went on to create Inogen, the first company to make portable oxygen concentrators available to the public. The mission behind the company was to help patients lead healthier, more active lives.

How to set up Inogen oxygen concentrators

On the Inogen website, there are several YouTube tutorial videos, including step-by-step videos on setting up Inogen’s portable oxygen machines. For example, the Inogen G5 video outlines nine simple steps for setting up your Inogen G5:

  • Step 1: Remove your Inogen G5 from the carrying bag
  • Step 2: Place the battery in your Inogen G5
  • Step 3: Ensure the particle filters are in place
  • Step 4: Charging the battery
  • Step 5: Connect the nasal cannula
  • Step 6: Turn on the G5
  • Step 7: Set the flow setting
  • Step 8: Position the nasal cannula
  • Step 9: Get comfortable with the G5

If you need assistance with setup, contact Inogen’s customer care team 24/7 at 1-877-466-4364.

Oxygen concentrators versus oxygen tanks

A portable oxygen concentrator is a medical device that delivers supplemental oxygen to those with low oxygen levels. For example, a doctor might prescribe oxygen therapy to someone with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Oxygen concentrators are typically smaller than compressed or liquid oxygen tanks, and they don’t require users to carry extra containers of oxygen. According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), “Concentrators are different than tanks or other containers supplying oxygen because they use electrical pumps to concentrate the continuous supply of oxygen that comes from the surrounding air.”3

A 2019 article in the clinical journal Breathe lists the differences between oxygen concentrators and oxygen tanks:

  • A power source is needed for a portable oxygen concentrator, while oxygen tanks operate without an external power source, instead relying on pressure to force the oxygen from the tank. The requirement for a constant power source may be a disadvantage for some people.
  • Operational costs are higher and regular transportation is required for oxygen tanks, versus oxygen concentrators, which have smaller operational costs and a one-time transport.
  • Oxygen tanks need to be replaced frequently by the oxygen provider, while oxygen concentrators supply an unlimited amount of oxygen.4

Krista Elkins, a paramedic and registered nurse, further explained the difference between an oxygen concentrator and oxygen tank: “An oxygen tank delivers actual liquid or gas oxygen to a person. The tank contains a finite amount of oxygen and that runs out once a person has used it all. An oxygen concentrator pulls the air from a person’s surroundings, filters [out nitrogen], and concentrates the oxygen. This becomes medical grade oxygen which can then be breathed.”

How much do Inogen portable oxygen concentrators cost?

Inogen portable oxygen concentrators vary in cost, ranging from $2,651 to $3,586, depending on the battery (single or double) and warranty you select.

On the Inogen website, you can purchase the G4 and G5 machines directly from the company. The G3 is only available through Medicare and other insurance providers.

  • The Inogen One G3 cost depends on your Medicare or insurance provider’s coverage.
  • The Inogen One G4 costs $2,651–$3,344, depending on the battery and warranty selected.
  • The Inogen One G5 costs $2,882–$3,586, depending on the battery and warranty selected.

There are no financing or payment plan options available, but Inogen does offer a 30-day risk-free trial for all of its portable oxygen concentrators.

Does insurance or Medicare cover portable oxygen concentrators?

Medicare Part B covers the rental of durable medical equipment, which includes oxygen concentrators if certain criteria are met. This includes criteria, such as if your doctor prescribes oxygen for severe lung disease or if your health may improve with oxygen therapy and other measures have failed.5

If you meet the criteria, Medicare helps pay for the rental of supplemental oxygen, containers, tubing, and other related supplies for the delivery of oxygen, but it does not cover the purchase of portable oxygen concentrators. If you buy a portable oxygen concentrator and meet your deductible, you will pay 20% of the Medicare-approved amount for those supplies.

As for insurance outside of Medicare, each insurance company varies on whether it’ll cover part or all of the costs of oxygen concentrators.

Check with your Medicare or insurance provider for more details. For additional information and help finding benefits you can use, visit NCOA’s Benefits CheckUp tool.

How to pay for Inogen portable oxygen concentrators

To purchase the G3, contact your Medicare or insurance provider. 

To buy the G4 or G5, make sure you have a current oxygen therapy prescription from your doctor, then go to the Oxygen Concentrator Store or Inogen website to choose the model you’d like to purchase.

After you select the model, battery type (single or double), and warranty options (3-year or unlimited), click “Add to Cart.” You can make your purchase using a Visa, Mastercard, American Express, or Discover credit card. After you submit, an Inogen representative will confirm your order by phone.

Inogen app and accessories

Inogen offers the Inogen Connect App for the G4 and G5. The app is not available for the G3. The app allows users to monitor information, such as battery life, battery status, nasal cannula life, filter life, column life, and more. Being able to easily check this information helps ensure  peace of mind that your portable oxygen concentrator is operating optimally and keeping you safe and healthy.

Several accessories and replacement parts are available for Inogen’s portable oxygen concentrators.

AccessoriesCostCompatible Models
External battery charger$330G3, G4, G5
Replacement column pair$114G3, G4, G5
AC power supply$91–$172G3 and G5 ($172); G4 ($91)
DC power cable$76G3, G4, G5
Replacement particle filter$14–$24G3 and G5 ($24); G4 ($14)
Transportation cart$145G3 and G4
Carrying bag$28–$68G3 ($57); G4 ($28); G5 ($68)
Backpack$116G3, G4, G5
BatteriesSingle: $393; Double: $597G4 and G5
Carrying strap and hip bagStrap: $16; Bag: $68G4

Users can purchase these accessories and replacement parts online at the Inogen website or the Oxygen Concentrator Store using a major credit card.

Inogen customer service and satisfaction

All of the models in this review are available through the online retailer Oxygen Concentrator Store. You can contact its customer service department in the following ways:

  • Phone: 844-885-9530, available 365 days a year on the following schedule:
    • 6:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. MT Monday through Friday
    • 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. MT Saturday
    • 8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. MT Sunday 
  • Email: service@amsrco.com
  • Online chat: On the Oxygen Concentrator Store’s support page
  • Contact form: Submit an online ticket and a representative will respond within one business day.

The Oxygen Concentrator Store website also has a detailed product support page with information on cleaning, maintenance, and use of portable oxygen concentrators.

Our Reviews Team’s customer service experience

A member of our Reviews Team called the Oxygen Concentrator Store to learn more information about all of the models in this list. It took less than 30 seconds to get a representative on the line, and he was friendly, helpful, and knowledgeable about every model we asked about.

He shared that all of the portable oxygen machines sold through Oxygen Concentrator Store come with a free seven-day trial period. If you find the unit you’ve purchased has mechanical problems, is hard to use, or just isn’t a good fit for you, call the store to receive a shipping label. Then you can send the unit back (at your own cost) and exchange it for a different one. 

After sharing details of the various models over the phone, the representative offered to email the information as well and gave us his direct phone number for any future questions. 

He also said even if we didn’t buy a unit from Oxygen Concentrator Store, he would be happy to answer questions and provide help in the future. We were very pleased with the customer service experience; it felt like we were learning about portable oxygen concentrators rather than enduring a high-pressure sales call.

Inogen warranty, maintenance, and care

All of Inogen’s portable oxygen concentrator models offer a 3-year standard warranty, including three years on the concentrator, one year on the sieve beds (the filters inside the oxygen concentrator), battery, and accessories. Inogen customers can also upgrade to a lifetime warranty for an extra cost, which varies for each model.

To clean your portable oxygen concentrator, Inogen recommends cleaning your nasal cannula daily, the concentrator case when it gets dusty, and the particle filters—which are the filters on the front—weekly. You can use a damp washcloth with water and a mild detergent to clean them.

For battery maintenance, Inogen recommends keeping batteries dry at all times and avoiding using the portable oxygen concentrator in temperatures less than 41 F or higher than 95 F. This will ensure proper usage and care of your batteries.

Who uses portable oxygen concentrators

“Probably the most common chronic condition that oxygen can be used to help treat is COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). As this disease progresses, supplemental oxygen often becomes a standard therapy for this condition,” said Christopher Norman, a geriatric nurse practitioner based in New York state.

According to the American Lung Association, “In 2018, 16.4 million people, or 6.6% of adults, reported a diagnosis of any type of COPD (chronic bronchitis, emphysema, or COPD).”6

COPD, as defined by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, is an obtrusive condition in which ”less air flows in and out of the airways, making it hard to breathe.”7 COPD has a severe impact on quality of life and often results in the need for supplemental oxygen.

While traditional oxygen tanks and machines are beneficial for people with COPD, they can be heavy and burdensome, affecting independence and limiting travel. For those who are otherwise able to leave their home, a portable oxygen concentrator can greatly improve quality of life.

When our Reviews Team asked Norman if the need for extra oxygen is usually permanent or temporary, he said it depends. “When a person is discharged from the hospital, [if they] continue to have difficulty breathing, supplemental oxygen can be used while a person progresses through a comprehensive treatment plan to get stronger and feel better, and depending on their underlying medical conditions and how the post-hospitalization period goes, the person might end up not needing supplemental oxygen anymore.

“On the other hand,” he continued, “sometimes the need for supplemental oxygen becomes permanent after a hospitalization—it all depends on the medical conditions and how a person does after the event that led to the hospitalization in the first place.”

Table 2 Comparisons of Inogen vs. other portable oxygen concentrators, as of June 2022

Companies

Inogen

CAIRE

DeVilbiss

Philips Respironics

Costs

$2,651–$3,586

$2,749

$3,562

$2,995

Delivery/flow type

Intermittent

Intermittent

Intermittent

Intermittent

Weight (pounds)

2.8–5.7

5

4.8

5

Battery life (hours)

2.25–13

8–16

3.5

4.5–9

FAA-approved

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

What to consider before buying an oxygen concentrator

When purchasing a portable oxygen concentrator, our Reviews Team recommends that you consider the following criteria:

  • Price: The cost of portable oxygen concentrators varies from approximately $2,500–$4,000. Most people are guided by their budget when choosing the concentrator that’s best for them.
  • Weight: Most models range from around 3–20 pounds. If you’re concerned about weakness or fatigue, a lighter model might be best for you.
  • Battery life: Most portable oxygen concentrator models last between 2–5 hours on a fully charged, rechargeable battery. If you enjoy traveling, visiting family or friends, and being outside the home, you’ll want to choose a machine with a longer battery life.
  • Noise level: One concern many portable oxygen users have is the sound coming from the machine, as they don’t want it to be distracting to others. If you’re looking for a quieter unit, look for a machine with lower decibels.
  • Wearability: Users can wear portable oxygen concentrators in various ways, such as with an adjustable strap draped over the shoulder, a carrying bag that looks similar to a bag or purse, or a backpack. If independence is a priority, finding a concentrator that is the most comfortable for you is important. When researching portable oxygen concentrators, ask the company how customers usually wear their machines.

Inogen oxygen concentrator customer reviews

Inogen is accredited by the Better Business Bureau (BBB) and has a customer rating of 1.27 stars out of 5, based on 45 customer reviews.8

While Inogen’s BBB customer rating is low, it’s worth noting that it’s accredited by the BBB with an A+ rating. Customer reviews don’t factor into the BBB ratings—those are determined by things like whether the company responds to complaints in a timely fashion and whether customers are satisfied with the way their complaints were handled.

The company is also verified on Trustpilot, with a “great” rating of 4 out of 5 stars, based on more than 2,000 reviews.9 

Arrived on time with no hassles. Been using it every night. If I stop breathing, or the cannula falls out, it starts beeping at me!

—JAMES, VERIFIED CUSTOMER REVIEW (TRUSTPILOT.COM)

I now have the freedom to travel to visit family and not have to worry about low blood oxygen. So light that it weighs less than my purse. I purchased the G4, which meets my needs now, but wish I would have purchased the G5 for the higher oxygen levels settings for future needs.

—LINDA, VERIFIED CUSTOMER REVIEW (TRUSTPILOT.COM)

“I really like the portability of the unit I have now, and I’m glad I bought it with both a small battery and a large one. However, I find the larger battery to be exhausting to carry, and if I had it to do over, I would have bought another small one. I don’t find it particularly quiet, but I used it at a Broadway performance of Hamilton the first time out, and no one seemed bothered at all.”

—BARBARA, VERIFIED CUSTOMER REVIEW (TRUSTPILOT.COM)

Bottom line

Inogen offers three light-weight (2.8–5.7 pounds), intermittent flow oxygen concentrators that are all FAA-approved. Though the prices vary from $2,651–$3,586, there are different options to choose from that can change the cost: the battery (single or double) and the warranty (3-year or unlimited).

Inogen may be the right choice if you want intermittent flow and a lighter oxygen concentrator. If your doctor or health care provider has prescribed a continuous flow oxygen concentrator, you will need to select another type of portable oxygen concentrator.

Frequently Asked Questions

Have questions about this review? Email us at reviewsteam@ncoa.org.

Sources

  1. World Health Organization, “Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).” Found on the internet at https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/chronic-obstructive-pulmonary-disease-(copd)
  2. 3M “The Sound Around Us.” Found on the internet at https://multimedia.3m.com/mws/media/1172941O/decibel-scale-poster-trifecta-hr-pdf.pdf
  3. US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) “Pulse Oximeters and Oxygen Concentrators: What to Know About At-Home Oxygen Therapy.” Found on the internet at https://www.fda.gov/consumers/consumer-updates/pulse-oximeters-and-oxygen-concentrators-what-know-about-home-oxygen-therapy
  4. Breathe, European Respiratory Journal, “Oxygen devices and delivery systems.” Found on the internet at https://breathe.ersjournals.com/content/15/3/e108
  5. Medicare.gov, “Oxygen equipment & accessories.” Found on the internet at https://www.medicare.gov/coverage/oxygen-equipment-accessories
  6. American Lung Association “COPD Prevalence.” Found on the internet at https://www.lung.org/research/trends-in-lung-disease/copd-trends-brief/copd-prevalence
  7. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute “What is COPD?” Found on the internet at https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/copd
  8. Better Business Bureau, “Inogen.” Found on the internet at https://www.bbb.org/us/ca/goleta/profile/medical-supplies/inogen-1236-92003218
  9. Trustpilot, “Inogen.” Found on the internet at https://www.trustpilot.com/review/inogen.com

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