To successfully implement evidence-based programs, it is important to build demand for the programs and establish efficient systems for handling logistics such as marketing, recruitment, enrollment, and retention of participants. Centralizing or coordinating these functions within a state can increase efficiency, improve quality, and help to ensure that consistent messages and approaches are used to reach the target populations.

Don’t reinvent the wheel. Take advantage of existing marketing materials, such as NCOA’s customizable templates for marketing, which includes brochures, posters, and other materials in English and Spanish.

A number of states have implemented strategies to strengthen the marketing and branding of evidence-based programs, including the adoption of statewide program names, use of toll-free numbers, development of websites, and creation of statewide marketing materials.

Webinars and Presentations

Guides and Toolkits

Marketing Materials

Print Materials- Posters

Print Materials- Brochures

Print Materials- Infographics

Print Materials- Other

Promotional Videos

Other Resources

Session Zero Resources

Some states are conducting a Session Zero to increase the number of people who participate in and complete workshops. Session Zero is an optional pre-workshop session that provides an overview of the program, explains expectations for workshop participation, and secures commitments from participants to aim to complete the program. Some states collect baseline data from participants during Session Zero. [1]

Webinars and Presentations

Tools and Tip Sheets

Centralized Websites with Marketing and Referral Tools

Success Stories

Caregivers and People with Dementia

The physical, emotional, and financial burden that caregiving places on individuals, puts them at risk for developing chronic conditions.[2] Evidence-based programs can benefit both the individual who has a chronic condition, as well as the caregiver. Respite funds or supplemental services funds available through Title IIIE of the Older Americans Act can be used to provide care for adults with chronic health conditions, while caregivers attend workshops.

Webinars and Presentations

Adults with Disabilities

State and community-based organizations have developed strategic approaches to assure that participants with disabilities are included in evidence-based programming. They serve adults with a variety of disabilities, including low vision and blindness, deafness and hearing loss, intellectual and developmental disabilities, behavioral and mental health conditions, and physical disabilities.[3]

Webinars and Presentations

Resources

Success Stories

Emergency Protocols

People with Low Literacy

Webinars and Presentations

Resources

Racial and Ethnic Minorities

Members of racial and ethnic minority groups in the U.S. face disproportionate chronic disease burden and disparities related to health care access.[4] State- and community-based organizations are working to increase access to and use of evidence-based programs among minority populations to improve their quality of life and health status.

Webinars and Presentations

Success Stories

Outreach to African Americans

Webinars

Success Stories

Outreach to Native Americans

Webinars

Resources

Success Stories

Outreach to Hispanic and Latino Populations

States are successfully collaborating with a variety of agencies to offer the Tomando Control de su Salud program and Programa de Manejo Personal de la Diabetes, such as the Consortium for Latino Immigration Studies at the University of South Carolina and the Core el Centro in Wisconsin. Individuals who reflect the communities they serve, such as Promotoras and Community Health Workers are effective in recruiting participants and serving as workshop leaders and trainers.

Resources

Success Stories

Rural Populations

Webinars and Presentations

Resources

Success Stories

Veterans

View NCOA’s tip sheet on Engaging Veterans in Evidence-Based Programs.

[1] Jiang L, Smith ML, Chen S, Ahn S, Kulinski KP, Lorig K and Ory MG (2015) The role of Session Zero in successful completion of Chronic Disease Self-Management Program workshops. Front. Public Health 2:205. doi: 10.3389/fpubh.2014.00205.

[2] Robert Wood Johnson. Chronic Care: Making the Case for Ongoing Care. 2010. https://www.ncoa.org/resources/chronic-care-making-the-case-for-ongoing-care/

[3] To learn more about working with people with disabilities, please see the NCOA Tip Sheet, Chronic Disease Self-Management Education and People with Disabilities: Successful Practices, 2015. https://www.ncoa.org/resources/chronic-disease-self-management-education-and-people-with-disabilities-successful-practices/

[4] Boutaugh, ML, Jenkins, SM, et al. Closing the Disparity Gap: the Work of the Administration on Aging. Journal of the American Society on Aging. Vol. 38. No.4, 2015, pp. 107-118. https://www.ncoa.org/resources/closing-the-disparity-gap-the-work-of-the-administration-on-aging/