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6 ways to stay physically active in winter

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services just released the 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. The guidelines recommend that adults move more and sit less throughout the day by engaging in a combination of aerobic activities, as well as balance training and muscle strengthening.

Exercising during the winter months can be challenging as temperatures drop, roads and sidewalks are slippery, and storms prevent outdoor activities. Here are 6 ways to keep active this season.

1. Explore arthritis-friendly exercise videos

Check out these short videos with exercises focused on reducing joint pain through stretching and building strength. There are options for working out your upper and lower body, as well as trying out Tai Chi, all in your own home.

2. Find an exercise class near you

It can be hard to stay motivated while exercising alone. Find an evidence-based exercise class that can offer different options for activities and provide an opportunity to meet up with friends.

3. Go mall walking

This Mall Walking Resource Guide provides ideas for walking solo or with a group at a local mall. Moving your regular walks inside for the winter provides a warm, safe, and well-lit environment to keep active.

4. Take steps to prevent falls

If you do walk outside, take precautions to avoid slips and trips on icy sidewalks. Check out how you can Winterize to Prevent Falls.

5. Get a workout to go

Go4Life’s Workout to Go guide has several options for exercising in your own home, including hand grips, wall pushups, and arm raises.

6. Find an indoor community pool or track

Many local Parks and Recreation Centers and YMCAs offer physical activity options, such as swimming, walking on indoor tracks, and group exercise for older adults.

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Katie Zuke

About Kathleen Zuke

Kathleen is Senior Program Manager for NCOA’s Center for Healthy Aging. Her work focuses on empowering individuals and communities to better manage chronic conditions.

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