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Falls Prevention Matters Now More Than Ever

Approximately 25% of older adults in the United States fall each year. Despite being common, falls shouldn’t be seen as a normal part of aging. After all, most falls are preventable. Everyone is struggling to navigate the challenges posed by COVID-19, but older adults who want to maintain their independence and health should take time to understand and reduce their risk of falling. To assist with this effort, we’re proud to announce the release of a new, free way to help: the Falls Free CheckUp  

The checkup provides users with printable results and a simple score they can bring to their family, doctor, or pharmacist to discuss. (That’s right—even pharmacists are part of the team that can help prevent falls.) Having a simple point of reference to help start these conversations makes them easier and more effective. Both the English and Spanish versions of the checkup take a very short time to complete. 

Remember that preventing falls is about protecting the independence of older adults, not limiting their activity! Caregivers and family members should use our conversation guide for advice on how to make the well-being of a loved one the center of the discussion. Despite physical distancing guidelines, there’s still plenty that can be done to reduce falls. We have tips for older adults and caregivers, a list  of evidence-based falls prevention programs, and a Falls Free CheckUp Chat coming to our Facebook page on Sept. 23 at 6:30 p.m. ET. 

Falls are preventable! Empowering older adults starts with information from a simple screening, so complete a Falls Free CheckUp for yourself and encourage others to do the same. You’ll learn something new and be supported in the steps you take to reduce your fall risk. Use the #FallsFree hashtag on social media to tell us about what you’re doing to reduce the number of falls 

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About Dan Reiner

Dan Reiner is Digital Experiences Manager at the National Council on Aging. He lives in an intergenerational household with his wife, three children, brother, and parents.

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