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Women’s History Month Reminds Us Things Have Gotten Better

Women’s History Month is a chance to remember major milestones that made aging well easier for women. Since the beginning of the 20th century, life expectancy has increased significantly due to improvements in public health, nutrition, and medical technology including improved treatments and better medications for heart disease, stroke, infectious diseases, and certain cancers, such as breast and colon cancers.

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Supporting Black Futures During Black History Month by Ending Diabetes Disparities

African American older adults are disproportionately affected by diabetes, which affects more than 10% of African American adults.

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Simple Tips for Eating Well

There are few things in life as comforting and nourishing as food, but it can be controversial and confusing, too.

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Listen to Your Heart and Help Raise Awareness About Valve Disease

Recognizing the need to raise awareness about heart valve disease, more than 55 organizations—led by the Alliance for Aging Research and including NCOA—come together each year on Feb. 22 with the common goal of encouraging people to Listen to their Hearts.

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Never Alone: An Interview with Long-Term HIV Survivors

While HIV can now be a long-term, manageable chronic disease for many, it can present a unique set of challenges for those living and aging with the virus. Many people living with HIV describe feelings of loneliness and isolation. NCOA participates in the HIV: The Long View Coalition to share stories from long-term HIV survivors.

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4 Ways to Prevent Heart Disease Using Medicare

The number 1 cause of death for people age 65 and older in the United States is heart disease. Review this list of easy-to-do practices to reduce your risk and live a long and healthy life.

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Anna Maria Chávez and U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging Discuss Navigating Critical Decisions to Age Well

The U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging invited NCOA to discuss the staggering number of decisions Americans have to make – often on their own – as they age. Anna Maria Chávez shares her testimony.

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